and on the urban nature table today

are you sitting comfortably children? today we have some blossom! alas not a sprig from a tree. . . but a growing pile, swept by the soft winds of April into the corners of gutters, of tiny dried up petals

despite this, the petals are very pretty, so as to distinguish themselves from and not to be confused with the growing piles of ash. . .

(possibly volcanic, but I'm not an expert)

and adding some colour, we have a few screwed up and discarded parking tickets

(not mine, children, you'll be pleased to know -
seeing as I don't have a car and thus am not subject to ticketing)

but of most interest today, and I'd like your help with this if any of you are keen oologists: an egg! well, not quite an egg, as I'll explain...

but first I'd like your help please, in identifying the egg. . . yes, Kenneth, I know you are a twitterer, but that's not quite the same thing is it? now - what I'd like to know is, does anyone have their copy of The Observer's Book of Bird Eggs in their desk? for that would be of great help

you see, I have looked and looked thru all the encyclopedias in the library, but I cannot find a picture of the egg I am trying to identity. . . it is quite small, about an inch long, no, David, I do not know what that is in the new fandangled metric system, but I suppose it would be very helpful if you could tell us, and the shell is pure white - a kind of blue-white, without actually being blue, and there are no spots or other kinds of identifying marks on the egg

and the reason I only have the shell, as opposed to the whole egg, is because last night one of the cats must have brought it into the house, yes, Melanie, that does mean that the cat found the egg in a nest in a tree of one of the gardens up the street and carried it carefully in its mouth all the way back - including jumping up to the roof of my kitchen and then down into the courtyard and in thru the catflap, I know, cats are pretty clever aren't they, and then left it as a gift for me on the rug in the breakfast room. . .

. . .where, unfortunately, one of my children stepped on it, I know Jospeh, it's not what you expect to find on the rug in the breakfast room, is it, and no, Christopher, I suppose she wasn't looking where she was going as she didn't really need to because usually there aren't eggs left on the floor, are they, and yes her brothers did laugh when she squealed about having trodden on an egg and yes I did say that she couldn't have trodden on an egg because as far as I was concerned there weren't any eggs in the house. . .

yes Melanie, it is storytime now - and I have the perfect tale for today. . .
are you sitting comfortably? then I'll begin

10 comments:

Dave said...

Chicken egg, from fridge.

I have no idea what foreigners might call an inch.

I, Like The View said...

no - you see, I don't keep my eggs in the fridge, had none anyhow, plus this was about half the size of a chicken egg, plus the yolk was far far brighter than even a free-range-organic-chicken egg

but thanks!

Dave said...

Duck?

ziGGi said...

Green eggs and ham :)
It was once prescribed to me by a doctor you know - strangely this is a true fact!

Christopher said...

I'm sure it was a present from a well-wisher. Easter's a movable feast and not all cats are capable of working out the true date with all that business of epacts and golden numbers etc.

dinahmow said...

Bantam?

I, Like The View said...

dinah it was actually probably about a quarter the size of a chicken egg. . . I haven't heard any chickeny sounds (does a bantam sound like a chicken?) - I'm not saying that noone in Putney keeps chickens (altho the gardens around here are the size of a coop!!)

you think it could be a bantam. . .

(how would I investigate that!)

Christopher I don't know which one of the two (out of the four) who've worked out how to get out of the courtyard it could be, but whichever one it was it was a very clever cat. . .

so, no thoughts about the type of egg then. . .

me neither!

ZiggZ that is very strange! (what is a green egg?)

Dave if we still lived in The Village near The Pond (and if the cats had bigger mouths) that might be a possibility. . . but I don't see many ducks around here (I must ask the cats if they do). . .

. . .seagulls, possibly. . . but I doubt they'd nest in the local gardens

mig said...

House Martins? Ours haven't arrived yet but maybe you're further South than us. I think ours have white eggs.
If your cat brought home a bantam egg, it's a daring cat. They're ever so fierce and very small.

Mel said...

Oh.
I'm sure the kitty was just bringing a prezzie--not leftovers.

Not a robin's egg? It's that time of year for robins to lay.

House finch, maybe?
Gosh, if I knew the birdies there, maybe I'd have a better guess.

Doubtful, of course....but maybe. LOL

I adore Dr. Seuss, btw. :-)

dinahmow said...

OK...if local chooks are unlikely, how about a budgie egg? That's short for budgerigar. Their eggs are small (about 1/4 chook egg) and white and Putney People probably have budgies.
If your moggy stole an egg, what happened to the budgie? Oops! Change the subject-quick!